Martin County

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File #: 19-0445   
Type: Departmental Status: Passed
In control: Board of County Commissioners
On agenda: 4/23/2019 Final action: 4/23/2019
Title: A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE VOLUNTARY REDUCTION OF SINGLE-USE PLASTIC STRAWS AND POLYSTYRENE AND THE OVERALL REDUCTION OF PLASTICS IN MARTIN COUNTY
Attachments: 1. single use plastics Resolution_rev final draft 4.10.19.pdf, 2. Supplemental Memo - usd2019M360 Single Use Plastics.pdf, 3. Single Use Plastics Presentation.pdf
PLACEMENT: Departmental
TITLE:
title
A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE VOLUNTARY REDUCTION OF SINGLE-USE PLASTIC STRAWS AND POLYSTYRENE AND THE OVERALL REDUCTION OF PLASTICS IN MARTIN COUNTY
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
executive summary
Pursuant to Board of County Commission direction, staff has drafted a Resolution supporting voluntary reduction of single-use plastic straws, polystyrene and plastic use in general to preserve, protect and enhance local Florida waterways and prevent plastic pollution from entering the marine environment. An outreach program to educate the public, K-12 students and businesses will be implemented in collaboration with local and regional partners to provide information on plastic pollution harm and to encourage and support alternative practices and use of marine friendly products.
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DEPARTMENT: Utilities and Solid Waste
PREPARED BY: Name: Anne Murray
Title: Hydrogeologist / Water Resources Coordinator
REQUESTED BY: Sam Amerson, P.E., Utilities & Solid Waste Director

PRESET:
PROCEDURES: None

BACKGROUND/RELATED STRATEGIC GOAL:

At present, global plastic production is equivalent to hundreds of millions of tons per year and is predicted to double within the next 10 years. Less than one fifth of all plastic is recycled. Approximately 40 percent of all plastic produced is in single use disposable plastics. These plastics include non-biodegradable beverage bottles, plastic bags, packaging, food containers and plastic straws. Each year an estimated 10 million tons of plastic enters the ocean mostly from land. This plastic waste stream joins the approximately 150 million tons of debris that are caught up in the world's ocean currents forming massive collections of marine trash. Eventually, as the plastic is exposed to the elements, it breaks down in to smaller pieces that are consumed by marine life in place of food causing starvation and death. Plastic waste can sicken or kill coral reefs by blocking sunlight from reaching...

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